Cloud Services

Azure SDK for .NET 3.0 available for Visual Studio 2015/2017

April 2, 2017 .NET, .NET Framework, Add-In's, App Service, Azure, Azure SDK, Azure SDK Tools, Cloud Services, General, Microsoft, Microsoft SDKs, Visual Studio 2013, Visual Studio 2015, Visual Studio 2017, VS2013, VS2015, VS2017, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8.1, Windows Azure, Windows Azure Development, Windowz Azure No comments

Windows Azure SDK for .NET, which include SDKs, basic tools, and extended tools for Visual Studio development for Azure Cloud enabled applications.  Microsoft has released latest Azure SDK for .NET along with Visual Studio 2017 (RTW). The new version v3.0 will support only Visual Studio 2015/2017, if you are using Visual Studio 2013 you can use Azure SDK for .NET v2.9.6.

You can have both the version side by side, by uninstalling earlier version first for Visual Studio 2013 and installing latest version to support newer visual studio.

There is not much major changes included in this release:

  • All the tools you need to do Azure development will be part of Visual Studio 2017 going forward.
  • For Visual Studio 2015 the SDK will still be available through WebPI.
  • Microsoft have discontinued Azure SDK for .NET releases for Visual Studio 2013 now that Visual Studio 2017 has been released.

Download: Azure SDK for .NET 3.0  – VS 2015   |  VS 2013 (v2.9.6 )   |  All Versions (including Java/Node.JS)

Azure IoT Hub Device Management–Released to Public

November 17, 2016 .NET, Azure, Azure IoT Suite, Cloud Services, Cloud to Device, Connectivity, Device Shadow, Device to Cloud, Device Twin, Internet Appliance, Internet of Things, IoT, IoT Hub, machine-to-machine (M2M), Microsoft, Tech-Trends No comments ,

Today Microsoft has announced general availability of Azure IoT Hub Device Management. With this release Azure IoT Hub subscribers/customers will be able to get access to following features and functionalities:

  • Device twin. Use a digital representation of your physical devices to synchronize device conditions and operator configuration between the cloud and device.
  • Direct methods. Apply a direct, performant action on a connected device through the cloud.
  • Jobs. Broadcast and schedule device twin changes and methods to scale management operations across millions of devices.
  • Queries. Create real-time, dynamic reports across device twins and jobs to attest status and health for entire device collections, whether your devices are online or offline.

Useful References:

Scalability – Scale Out/In vs Scale Up/Down (Horizontal Scaling vs Vertical Scaling)

October 1, 2016 Architecture, Azure, Cloud Computing, Cloud Services, Horizontal Scaling, Performance, Reliability, Resilliancy, Scalability, Scale Down, Scale In, Scale Out, Scale Up, Software/System Design, Vertical Scaling, Virtualization No comments

When you work with Cloud Computing or normal Scalable highly available applications you would normally hear two terminologies called Scale Out and Scale Up or often called as Horizontal Scaling and Vertical Scaling.  I thought about covering basics and provide more clarity for developers and IT specialists.

What is Scalability?

Scalability is the capability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work, or its potential to be enlarged to accommodate that growth. For example, a system is considered scalable if it is capable of increasing its total output under an increased load when resources (typically hardware) are added.

A system whose performance improves after adding hardware, proportionally to the capacity added, is said to be a scalable system.

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This will be applicable or any system such as :

  1. Commercial websites or Web application who have a larger user group and growing frequently,
  2. or An immediate need to serve a high number of users for some high profile event or campaign.
  3. or A streaming event that would need immediate  processing capabilities to serve streaming to larger set of users across certain region or  globally.
  4. or A immediate work processing or data processing that requires higher compute requirements that usual for a certain job.

Scalability can be measured in various dimensions, such as:

  • Administrative scalability: The ability for an increasing number of organizations or users to easily share a single distributed system.
  • Functional scalability: The ability to enhance the system by adding new functionality at minimal effort.
  • Geographic scalability: The ability to maintain performance, usefulness, or usability regardless of expansion from concentration in a local area to a more distributed geographic pattern.
  • Load scalability: The ability for a distributed system to easily expand and contract its resource pool to accommodate heavier or lighter loads or number of inputs. Alternatively, the ease with which a system or component can be modified, added, or removed, to accommodate changing load.
  • Generation scalability: The ability of a system to scale up by using new generations of components. Thereby, heterogeneous scalability is the ability to use the components from different vendors.

Scale-Out/In / Horizontal Scaling:

To scale horizontally (or scale out/in) means to add more nodes to (or remove nodes from) a system, such as adding a new computer to a distributed software application.

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Pros:

  • Load is distributed to multiple servers
  • Even if one server goes down, there are servers to handle the requests or load.
  • You can add up more servers or reduce depending on the usage patterns or load.
  • Perfect for highly available web application or batch processing operations.

Cons:

  • You would need additional hardware /servers to support. This would increase increase infrastructure and maintenance costs.
  • You would need to purchase additional licenses for OS or required licensed software’s.

Scale-Up/Down/Vertical Scaling:

To scale vertically (or scale up/down) means to add resources to (or remove resources from) a single node in a system, typically involving the addition of CPUs or memory to a single computer.

image

Pros

  • Possibility to increase CPU/RAM/Storage virtually or physically.
  • Single system can serve all your data/work processing needs with additional hardware upgrade being done.
  • Minimal cost for upgrade

Cons

  • When you are physically or virtually maxed out with limit, you do not have any other options.
  • A crash could cause outages to your business processing jobs.

We discussed in detail about the both approach in Scalability, depending on the need you will have to choose right approach. Nowadays high availability of cloud computing platforms like Amazon AWS/Microsoft Azure etc., you have lots of flexible ways to Scale-Out or Scale-Up on a Cloud environment, which provides you with virtually unlimited resources, provided you are being capable to pay off accordingly.

Hope this information was helpful, please leave your comments accordingly if you find any discrepancies or you have any queries. 

Azure Tips: Service Bus vs Azure Queue

September 20, 2016 Azure, Cloud Services, Windows Azure Development No comments

Azure Service bus is a queuing technology that supports advanced features and allows access by processes created using various technologies and running in different domains. It allows ability to publish a message to multiple subscribers.  read more

Azure Queue is another queuing technology. However, it does not support the ability to publish a message to multiple subscribers. When a message is picked up, it is made invisible until the visibility timeout elapses. read more

New Certification – MCSD – Azure Solution Architect

May 25, 2015 .NET, .NET Framework, AppFabric, Azure, Azure Tools, Certification, Cloud Services, KnowledgeBase, MCSD, Microsoft, SQL Azure, Visual Studio 2013, VisualStudio, VS2013, Windows Azure Development, Windowz Azure No comments

Microsoft has made availability of new MCSD certification called as “MCSD – Azure Solutions Architect“.

Required Exams:
070-532: Developing Microsoft Azure Solutions
070-533: Implementing Microsoft Azure Infrastructure Solutions
070-534: Architecting Microsoft Azure Solutions

Once you complete the above required exams you will be awarded MCSD – Azure Solutions Architect certificate valid for 2 years.

PS: You will have to retake the renewal exam every two years to stay on as an MSDN Azure Solutions Architect.

For more details on the certification: https://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/mcsd-azure-architect-certification.aspx 

All you need to know about Microsoft Azure Stack(Azure on On-Premises

May 20, 2015 Azure, Azure Stack, Cloud Computing, Cloud Services, IaaS, Microsoft, PaaS, SaaS, Storage, Backup & Recovery, Virtual Machines, Windows Azure Development, Windowz Azure No comments

Typically it is a hype among people that if a product comes from Microsoft, it needs to be criticized and thinking Microsoft would only be promoting their products with Azure. That’s not right and I would say we are being judgmental without even looking at the capabilities on Microsoft Azure.

Microsoft Azure the prime competitor to Amazon AWS offerings, has improved a lot and focus is more on providing cloud computing capabilities available for everyone.

azurestack1

What is Microsoft Azure Stack?

Simply it paves a way to engaging your data-center with On-premise – Private/Hybrid cloud computing capabilities.

Azure Stack is a combined solution consisting of Windows Server 2016, Azure Pack and Azure Service Fabric.

  1. Azure Pack is an arrangement of Azure features that Microsoft makes accessible to its facilitating hosting service providers and bigger business clients as a download that can keep running on top of Windows Server and Systems Center. 
  2. Service Fabric is the new infrastructure management technology Microsoft is integrating in to Azure and Windows Server that will empower applications to be developer, deployed and oversaw in micro-service structure.
  3. Windows Server 2016 is an upcoming server operating system developed by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems, developed concurrently with Windows 10 expected to be released in Q3, 2016 and is currently under Technical Preview.

Here’s a simplified view of the Azure Stack Architecture(Sourced from Microsoft Azure Stack Documentation):

    azurestack2
    What it takes to have Azure Stack – on your data-center?

    Read through this link for hardware requirements:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/12/22/azure_stack_hardware_specs/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/05/18/azure_stack_versus_azure_pack_whats_the_difference/